W. G. Wilson

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W G Wilson

The company was nothing to do with Wheeler & Wilson. The W. G. Wilson Company was originally based in Cleveland, but in 1875 moved to Chicago. By 1877 they had offices in New York, New Orleans, Chicago and a temporary office in Manchester (England). Machines were sold on easy terms of payment and delivered, free of charge, at any Railroad Depot in the United States where they had no Agents. At the Centennial Exposition of 1876 Wilson received the Grand Prize Medal and Diploma. "Three Wilson Machines will do as much work in one day as four other machines", allegedly.


Wilson Treadle

Courtesy of Janie Ecclestone

An early Wilson treadle. The tension shown here (requiring replacement) is the second style of tension used by the company on machines. Individual feet shaped pedal and the treadle wheel is in the centre of the back of the treadle. Machines were sold on easy terms of payment and delivered, free of charge, at any Railroad Depot in the United States where they had no Agents. An Illustrated Direction Book was furnished with each machine and a properly executed Certificate guaranteeing to keep it in repair, free of charge, for five years. The patent automatic 'cut off' prevented the machine from running backwards.

See the Weed album for a comparison of Wilson and Weed Pedals.


Buckeye 1

Courtesy of Claire Sherwell, from the Harry Berzack Museum

Serial #22372, c1870

As a treadle model the bobbin winder would be attached to the treadle. The machine has an early style of tension compared with the other two examples in this album. Forum Topic


Buckeye 2

c1872

Courtesy of Claire Sherwell, from the Harry Berzack Museum

A treadle model, with small hand wheel and later tension.


Serial #38590 - 1872

Courtesy of Ludger Halbur

Buckeye 3

Courtesy of Claire Sherwell, from the Harry Berzack Museum

Serial #56420, c1873

This machine is a hand machine and therefore has its bobbin winder attached to the base of the machine. It also has a larger hand wheel.


New Buckeye

Courtesy of Rijnko Fekkes

1870s

Improved Buckeye

Courtesy of Claire Sherwell, from the Harry Berzack Museum

Serial #336466, c1885

This model doesn't appear in books by Carter Bays or Grace Rogers Cooper. Was it even made in the USA?