New Home Sewing Machine Company

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New Home Sewing Machine Model Identifications

by Claire Sherwell
New Home. Picture: Claire Sherwell


There are over 160 pictures of New Home sewing machines in the NeedleBar Picture Library. While this page is being developed please refer to pictures and information from there: New Home Sewing Machines, the Johnson, Clark & Co Album and the Gold Medal Album.








Early Models

Early Factory. Picture: Claire Sherwell
Stephen French's 1868 Patent

Early company history may be found in the NeedleBar New Home topic in the Makers Forum

For information about early models (Original model, Dolly Varden, Home Companion, Improved Home Shuttle) see the Home Shuttle Survey


The Gold Medal Company manufactured machines for Johnson Clark & Co., the predecessor to the New Home Company of Orange, Mass. Previously the company grew out of partnerships of Thomas H White/William L Grout, then White/Barker, then Clark/Barker.




Improved Home Shuttle. Picture: Wil Moschetti
Improved Home Shuttle. Picture: Fran Holly
Improved Home Shuttle

The Improved Home Shuttle treadle on the left has a last patent date of July 28, 1868 belonging to its inventor, Stephen French. It was witnessed by A J Clark of Johnson Clark who became New Home's President, and John W Wheeler, who was to become the Treasurer and Secretary of New Home.

Prices: No. 1 - Intended to be used as a Hand Machine. It is also adapted for use on Table and Treadle, which will be furnished at any time for $12. It is capable of doing all that can be done on any Family Sewing Machine. $25.

No. 2 - Machine mounted on an Ornamental Iron Stand, with Black Walnut Top, Oil finish. Where a large amount of sewing is required, it is preferable to run the Machine with the Treadle. $37.

No. 3 - The same as No. 2, with the addition of a Cover to protect the Machine from dust when not in use. It is a very desirable style. $42.

No. 4 - Highly Ornamented and has four drawers and drop leaf. $52.

No. 5 - Machine with a full Cabinet Case, Black Walnut, Oil Finished or Polished, as ordered. The Machine and Case are finished in the Highest Style of the Art. $80.

The improved model was designed for family and light manufacturing purposes, sewing the lightest muslins to the heaviest cloth. "The only practical low-priced lock stitch sewing machine ever invented." It was guaranteed for five years.

Each machine was supplied with a shuttle, three extra bobbins, a hemmer and feller, braider, screwdriver, five needles, gauge, directions (English, German, French or Spanish) and clamp.


Home Companion. Picture: Ludger Halbur
Home Companion

Lockstitch machine. If the machine has R.K. stamped onto it, the initials are thought to be the British importer and distributor Rennick, Kelmsley & Co.












Gold Medal Chainstitch. Picture: Etipax
Gold Medal

A chainstitch machine.











Gold Medal Chainstitch, Octagonal. Picture: Kay Smith
Gold Medal

This Gold Medal was also produced with a rectangular stitchplate. Now a true collectible, but at the time it was manufactured to fulfill a low cost machine for people unable to afford better quality machines such as Singer and Wheeler & Wilson.











The Beginnings of the New Home Line

New Home Factory in Orange, Mass., c1882. Picture: Claire Sherwell
New Home Factory with Early Car. Picture: Chrys Gunther
An Account from 1882

Orange is beautifully situated among the hills of Franklin Co., Mass., on the Vermont and Massachusetts Rail Road, about ten miles from the Connecticut River. It is a thrifty and prosperous village of about 4,000 inhabitants, lying on both sides of Miller's River.

The Poosac Tunnel Line runs directly through the village, offering special advantages for transportation. Very low rates of freight can be obtained to all points.

Quite a variety of manufacturing is carried on in Orange. The most important industry is the New Home Sewing Machine Works, the history of which dates back to 1860.

Their shops are very extensive, containing nearly 200,000 square feet of flooring. An iron bridge spanning the river connects them with the foundry, which is 300 feet in length, and smelts between 15 and 20 tons daily. In view of the large increase of trade, a new furnace has been added capable of fusing 25 tons of iron at one heat, and making the foundry the best equipped in this part of the State. In 1879 a large fire swept away the buildings in which the cabinet work was made, but they have been replaced by larger and better ones. The Company have in the past year more than doubled their manufacturing capacity and are now turning out over 350 machines per day, giving employment to 600 men.


Pictures of the present day New Home Factory.


Home Sewing Machine. Picture: Claire Sherwell
Home Sewing Machine

Vibrating shuttle, round tension on top of arm instead of the later top tension. Made by Johnson, Clark before the name change to New Home Sewing Machine Company.















New Home Old Style (pre-model A). Photo: Miller
Key features of New Home Old Style (pre-model A)
New Home Old Style

Made by Johnson, Clark before name change to New Home Sewing Machine Co. Known simply as The Light Running New Home. The designation of Model A came later.


Key features: Vibrating shuttle using boat shuttle, square corners to bed, top tension without release lever, round needle and presser foot bars, simple 'spooler' instead of automatic bobbin winder, stitch regulator on bed without surround, different styles of presser lifter, note style of take up and shape of rear inspection plate. Socket feet attached by simple screw to rear.

Interchangeable Needles: 20x1 - Boye 4 - Schmetz 35:11 - Free BB - Brewer G - Torrington R - European 712


Early Instruction Manual or Instruction Manual







New Home New Style (pre-model A). Photo: Andy B
Key features of New Home New Style (pre-model A)
New Home New Style

Made by Johnson, Clark before name change to New Home Sewing Machine Co. Known simply as The Light Running New Home.


Key features: Vibrating shuttle using cylinder shuttle, square corners to bed, top tension without release lever, flat needle bar, simple 'spooler' or later automatic bobbin winder, introduction of new presser foot lifter, feet attached by simple screw to rear, stitch length regulator on bed, note two styles of take up and shape of rear inspection plate. Lily of the Valley or Meadow Weeds decals with 'New Home' bed decal.


Interchangeable Needles: 20x1 - Boye 4 - Schmetz 35:11 - Free BB - Brewer G - Torrington R - European 712








Late 19th/20th Century New Home Machines

The vast majority of New Home machines have the serial number on a Slide Plate.


Earlier models are often referred to by the "class" name eg New National, which became the model U, then US.


After the Free Sewing Machine Company took over New Home some models were sold under both the New Home and Free names (as well as other badged names). New Home machines started to use letters in front of their serial numbers in about 1930. The letters represent the model type. This applied to all models, including those with a Badged Name.


"New Home" models include: AC, AD, DA, DNHM, JL, KK, LN, M, MS, NH, NHR, NHL, NLR, TS, U, US, NLB.


Free produced models with the following designations (note duplications): A, AD, AAE, AE, ALE, ALR, AN, ANR, ARE, C, CCE, CE, DARE, FH, G, GE, K, KE, L, LE, N, NE, NMO, M, MM, ME, MO, P, PE, W, XE, ALB. For further information about Free Sewing Machine models, see the NeedleBar Picture Library.


Demise of New Home, National & Free


Needle information is taken from Mr NeedleBar's Needle Book compiled by Chrys Gunther, in which additional interchangeable needle makes and information about these models will be found. In many cases a 15x1 (2020) needle may be used in place of 20x1 and set slightly down.



Key features of New Home A1
New Home A1

Key features: Vibrating shuttle, rounded corners to bed, top tension with release lever, flat needle bar, stitch length regulator on bed, wide shank shuttle carrier (1/2" wide), note take up and shape of rear inspection plate.


Interchangeable Needles: 20x1 - Boye 4 - Schmetz 35:11 - Free BB - Brewer G - National C - White B - Torrington R - European 712











New Home A2. Photo: Gilles Vayre
Key features of New Home A2)
New Home A2

Key features: As A1 (vibrating shuttle, rounded corners to bed, top tension with release lever, stitch length regulator on bed, same take up and rear inspection plate), with curved end to flat needle bar, either style of bobbin winder, check for narrow shank shuttle carrier (3/8" wide), note foot holder.


Interchangeable Needles: 20x1 - Boye 4 - Schmetz 35:11 - Free BB - Brewer G - National C - White B - Torrington R - European 712








New Home A3. Photo: Sylvia Oudhuis
Key features of New Home A3)
New Home A3

Key features: Vibrating shuttle, rounded corners to bed, reverted to pointed end flat needle bar, top tension with release lever and new mounting, stitch length regulator on bed, narrow shank shuttle carrier, hand wheel without second hole, note take up and rear inspection plate, bobbin winder.


Interchangeable Needles: 20x1 - Boye 4 - Schmetz 35:11 - Free BB - Brewer G - National C - White B - Torrington R - European 712









Key features of Model AB
New Home AB

Key features: Vibrating Shuttle, top tension, flat needle bar measures 8 1/2" long, narrow shank shuttle carrier, note shape of rear inspection plate. Different belt guards for treadle and electric models.


Interchangeable Needles: 20x1 - Boye 4 - Schmetz 35:11 - Free BB - Brewer G - Torrington R - European 712







Key features of Model AC, AD, DA
New Home AC, AD, DA

Key features: Cam drive rotary machine, a descendant of the Free line, having a tangle free spool pin. Tension on face plate. Reversible stitch regulator is Germanic in appearance. Hand wheels available for treadle or electric models, serial number to rear or pillar. Uses Free rotary bobbin and case, bobbin case base has notched rim with solid center pin.


Interchangeable Needles: 206x13 - Boye 2 1/2 - Schmetz 21:32 - Free CC - Brewer T







Key features of Model AN, AH, NLH
New Home AN, NH, NLH

Key features: Gear drive rotary machine, a descendant of the Free line. Tension on face plate, stitch regulator on pillar. Hand wheels available for treadle or electric models. Uses Free rotary bobbin and case, bobbin case base has notched rim with solid center pin.


Interchangeable Needles: 206x13 - Boye 2 1/2 - Schmetz 21:32 - Free CC - Brewer T








New Home Model B. Photo: Wil Moschetti
Key features of Model B
New Home B

Key features: Vibrating Shuttle, top tension, flat needle bar measures 9 1/4", high mounted bobbin winder, narrow shank shuttle carrier, stitch length regulator on bed, note shape of rear inspection plate. Bed measures 14 1/4" x 7".


Interchangeable Needles: 20x1 - Boye 4 - Schmetz 35:11 - Free BB - Brewer G - Torrington R - European 712







New Home Model C Picture: TinaK
Key features of Model C
New Home C

Key features: Vibrating Shuttle, side tension (facing operator), round needle bar, capped presser and needle bars, narrow shank shuttle carrier, stitch length regulator on bed, note shape of rear inspection plate.


Interchangeable Needles: 20x1 - Boye 4 - Schmetz 35:11 - Free BB - Brewer G - Torrington R - European 712







Key features of Model D
New Home D

Key features: Vibrating Shuttle, side tension (facing operator), round needle bar, capped presser and needle bars, narrow shank shuttle carrier, stitch length regulator on pillar, second hole on hand wheel, note shape of rear inspection plate. See also Model P.


Interchangeable Needles: 20x1 - Boye 4 - Schmetz 35:11 - Free BB - Brewer G - Torrington R - European 712






Key features of Model E1
New Home Rotary E1 (different spool holder). Picture: Claire Sherwell
New Home E1

Key features: Rotary machine, serial numbers up to 3,030,440. E2 from 3,030,440 to 3,787,351. Note spool holder on top of arm. Bobbin case different from subsequent rotary models. Patents from 1904 to 1906.


Interchangeable Needles: 15x1 - Boye 16 - Schmetz 21:46 - Free AA - Brewer 11 - Torrington Y - European 691, 705 - HAx1










Key features of Model E3
New Home E3

Key features: Rotary machine, E3 and E4 machines have serial numbers from 3,787,351 to 3,820,456. Straight spool pin on arm, stitch regulator plate on bed. Note shape of bed plate swing cap.


Interchangeable Needles: 15x1 - Boye 16 - Schmetz 21:46 - Free AA - Brewer 11 - Torrington Y - European 691, 705 - HAx1












Key features of Model E4
Bobbin Cases
New Home E4

Key features: Rotary machine, E3 and E4 machines have serial numbers from 3,787,351 to 3,820,456. E5, E6 & E7 above 3,820,456. Straight spool pin on arm. Shape of bed plate swing cap as E3.


Interchangeable Needles: 15x1 - Boye 16 - Schmetz 21:46 - Free AA - Brewer 11 - Torrington Y - European 691, 705 - HAx1












Model F - Automatic Chainstitch Photo: Pat R
Automatic Chainstitch Parts
New Home Automatic Chainstitch Machine - F

Key features: chainstitch machine with automatic tension.


Interchangeable Needles: 1x11/25x1 - Boye 20 1/2 - Schmetz 02:45 - Free ACS - Brewer S - European 63, 64 - WY502













Model G, old style - Central Bobbin Rotary
Bobbin Cases

New Home G

Key features: A rotary machine known by New Home as a 'Central Bobbin Rotary' with same shaped bed swing cap as the later rotary models. Stitch regulator on pillar.


Interchangeable Needles: 15x1 - Boye 16 - Schmetz 21:46 - Free AA - Brewer 11 - Torrington Y - European 691, 705 - HAx1












Models JL, K, KK - Central Bobbin Oscillator
Model JL. Photo: James
New Home Oscillator - JL, K, KK

Key features: A Central Bobbin machine. Bobbin case finger points to one o'clock. Belt guard tension discs on hand wheel. "NHSMCO Rockford, Ill." diamond decal above the stitch length lever; "Light Running New Home Trade-Mark" with running dog logo on bed; "République Française Exposition Universelle, New Home 1889" decal on inside pillar.


Interchangeable Needles: 15x1 - Boye 16 - Schmetz 21:46 - Free AA - Brewer 11 - Torrington Y - European 691, 705 - HAx1









Model L
New Home Climax - L

Key features: A Vibrating Shuttle machine with top tension, stitch regulator on pillar, high mounted bobbin winder, low take up on face plate, round needle bar 8 3/4" long. See Model N.

Interchangeable Needles: 20x1 - Boye 4 - Schmetz 35:11 - Free BB - Brewer G - Torrington R - European 712












Model LN. Photo: Susan Adams
Key features of Model LN
New Home LN

Key features: This vibrating shuttle machine is unusual for New Home in not having a top tension and the reversible stitch regulator is Germanic in appearance. As a descendant of the Free brands it uses a tangle free spool pin and has a curved take up on the face plate (Free model C). Side (operator facing) tension. Serial number to rear of pillar.

Interchangeable Needles: 15x1 - Boye 16 - Schmetz 21:46 - Free AA - Brewer 11 - Torrington Y - European 691, 705 - HAx1







Model N. Photo: John Snell
Key features of Model N
New Home New Ideal - N

Key features: Vibrating shuttle machine, top tension, round needle bar measures 8 3/4" long, stitch length on pillar, narrow shank shuttle carrier, note shape of rear inspection plate.


Interchangeable Needles: 20x1 - Boye 4 - Schmetz 35:11 - Free BB - Brewer G - Torrington R - European 712









Model P. Photo: Claire Sherwell
Key features of Model P
New Home P

Key features: Vibrating shuttle machine, side tension (facing operator), note shape of rear inspection plate on left side, take up towards top of face plate.


Interchangeable Needles: 20x1 - Boye 4 - Schmetz 35:11 - Free BB - Brewer G - Torrington R - European 712










New Home Model R. Photo: Tina K
Key features of Model R1
New Home Ruby - R1

Key features: Vibrating shuttle machine, top tension, high mounted bobbin winder, minor changes to R2 (e.g. bed plate), R2 has electrical parts. Round needle bar, 8 1/2" long.

Instruction Manual for Model R - Ruby


Interchangeable Needles: 20x1 - Boye 4 - Schmetz 35:11 - Free BB - Brewer G - Torrington R - European 712







Key features of models TS, US etc
New Home T1 Iron Base. Photo: Connie Hill & Daveofsuffolk

New Home T : TS3D, TS3F, US500D, US500F, T3D, T3F, U500D, U500F, XE

Bed measurements: 11 3/8" x 7". There are several variations of this model of New Home hand crank machines. The main ones are


T1 - Vibrating shuttle, direct drive hand wheel (cheaper to produce), iron base (also cheaper to produce), rack & pinion bobbin winder, top tension, stitch regulator on pillar, note face plate


T2 - Vibrating shuttle, full sized rear inspection plate ("arm cap"), top tension, stitch regulator on pillar, note face plate


T3 - Vibrating shuttle, smaller rear inspection plate, top tension, stitch regulator on pillar, note face plate


Interchangeable Needles for T, U & XE: 20x1 - Boye 4 - Schmetz 35:11 - Free BB - Brewer G - Torrington R - European 712

Interchangeable Needles for TS & US: 15x1 - Boye 16 - Schmetz 21:46 - Free AA - Brewer 11 - Torrington Y - European 691, 705 - HAx1


New National Class - Model U. Photo: Claire Sherwell
Key features of Model U2
New Home New National - U

Key features: Vibrating shuttle, top tension, stitch regulator on pillar. Hand wheel as shown or variation, also variations in needle bar and bobbin winder (early rack & pinion style also used), as well as bed differences (cheaper iron based option). Bed measurements 11 3/8" x 7". Produced from the 1880s as their hand machine, through to the 1930s when it became the Model US. A three quarter sized machine hand crank.

Interchangeable Needles: 20x1 - Boye 4 - Schmetz 35:11 - Free BB - Brewer G - Torrington R - European 712



Manufacturing Machine. Picture: Claire Sherwell
New Home Manufacturing Machine

c1900. Especially adapted for use by tailors, extra large treadle table and base.
















Little Worker - Model V. Picture Linda Scholten
Key features of Model V

Model V, VM - New Home Midget, Little Worker

A vibrating shuttle machine (not chainstitch). Originally called the Little Worker, it became known as the New Home Midget, model V, a small hand machine. Model VM was the small electric version for AC current only. Sold with a table clamp or iron base to make the machine more stable while sewing. Also sold under badged names such as Mother's Helper (by Montgomery Ward) and Baby Sheridan in the US, also UNI in Australia.

The patents of April 4, 1911 and February 13, 1912 were both filed on December 5, 1910 by Orville Kies. Kies was President of the Knickerbocker Hand Sewing Machine Company of New York. Some machines have Knickerbocker on the stitch plate.


Interchangeable Needles: 20x1 - Boye 4 - Schmetz 35:11 - Free BB - Brewer G - Torrington R - European 712



Model 30
New Home No.30

Key features: Vibrating shuttle, tension on face plate, stitch length regulator on pillar, serial number to rear of pillar. Portable electric only.

Interchangeable Needles: 20x1 - Boye 4 - Schmetz 35:11 - Free BB - Brewer G - Torrington R - European 712











© Claire Sherwell 2009